Thursday, March 13, 2008

Ash vs. Lapilli

Volcanic ash and lapilli are two very common occurrences in a volcanic eruption. They occur when the molten rocks and lava are thrown in the air and cooled. Lapilli are bigger than as, as it can be as large as 64 mm, whereas ash is less than two mm at its largest. They are very common in volcanic eruptions, and are good clues towards finding where you are in a volcano.

Lapilli, meaning little stones in Latin, are somewhat large chunks of cooled lava. Normally, they look like shattered glass pieces , but sometimes they are melted together when a volcano has multiple eruptions. These are called welded tuffs. Bigger objects land closer to the volcano than smaller pieces, such as ash. Ash sometimes floats around the world in our atmosphere, because it is so small. Lapilli settle closer to the volcano, and the sections of lapilli get bigger. Ash, sometimes, mingles with the lapilli, forming layers that volcanologists use as timelines. They are very helpful in finding when the volcano erupted and for how long. Ash is very small, and tends to be everywhere. It coats many things in its reach like dust. Ash can also suffocate the residents of the volcano, becoming very dangerous. Ash and lapilli, however, are both pyroclastic flow, which also includes pumice, scoria, and many crystals. Pyroclastic flow are also known as tephra. Ash and lapilli also can form deposits when they gather. This is a good sign that you are close to the vent of a volcano.


Ash and Lapilli are very important pieces of volcanic eruptions. They can be found near volcanoes and used to find how long the eruptions lasted. They also can be used to see how old the volcano is. They are both very useful parts of the pyroclastic flow.
ms1

14 comments:

Anonymous said...

So, ash and lapilli are mostly the same thing.
cb5

Anonymous said...

Good Descriptions. Lots of facts and details.

AL1

student08 said...

I didn't know that ash and lapilli could be that similar, and yet different at the same time.

TMa1

Anonymous said...

How do ash and lapilli tell how old a volcano is?

Anonymous said...

Great descriptions. Also, very in depth. Good job. MM2

Anonymous said...

great research and explanation. You are officially my hero.

JW2

student08 said...

great information!! lost of good facts too. really good details!!

mg2

Anonymous said...

Oh i get it now only ash or lapilli is found near the volcano. but im still having a hard time understanding what lapilli is. it would be great if you could post a picture or a link to a picture.
thanks for the great info tho!
XD
(cd3)

Anonymous said...

I didn't know lapilli means "little stones in Latin"! You had a strong three paragraphs relating to the lava types. Nice work. GG4

Anonymous said...

niceeee!!!! ummm.... its sweet that lapilli amd ash are the same thing butdifferent at the same time. :]


Thanks for the help Tammy!!! jk


~HA 4

Anonymous said...

Great descriptions, Ash and Lapilli sound like there pritty much the same thing. C.B.4

Anonymous said...

very nice work on this and very good on all of the ash and EM

student08 said...

nice descriptions! very good report!

Anonymous said...

good descriptions and facts. well written
SH5